Apache Storm Tutorial

Our HadoopTpoint App is now available in google play store,please rate and comment it in play store : W3Schools

Apache Storm Tutorial

Introduction:

Apache Storm is a free and open source distributed realtime computation system. Storm makes it easy to reliably process unbounded streams of data, doing for realtime processing what Hadoop did for batch processing.  Storm has many use cases: realtime analytics, online machine learning, continuous computation, distributed RPC, ETL, and more. Storm is fast: a benchmark clocked it at over a million tuples processed per second per node.

Five characteristics make Storm ideal for real-time data processing workloads. Storm is:

  • Fast – benchmarked as processing one million 100 byte messages per second per node
  • Scalable – with parallel calculations that run across a cluster of machines
  • Fault-tolerant – when workers die, Storm will automatically restart them. If a node dies, the worker will be restarted on another node.
  • Reliable – Storm guarantees that each unit of data (tuple) will be processed at least once or exactly once. Messages are only replayed when there are failures.
  • Easy to operate – standard configurations are suitable for production on day one. Once deployed, Storm is easy to operate.

Here are some typical “prevent” and “optimizeuse cases for Storm

  “Prevent” Use Cases   “Optimize” Use Cases
 Financial Services
  • Securities fraud
  • Operational risks & compliance violations
  • Order routing
  • Pricing
  Telecom
  • Security breaches
  • Network outages
  • Bandwidth allocation
  • Customer service
  Retail
  • Shrinkage
  • Stock outs
  • Offers
  • Pricing
  Manufacturing
  • Preventative maintenance
  • Quality assurance
  • Supply chain optimization
  • Reduced plant downtime
  Transportation
  • Driver monitoring
  • Predictive maintenance
  • Routes
  • Pricing
  Web
  • Application failures
  • Operational issues
  • Personalized content

Components of a Storm cluster:

A Storm cluster is superficially similar to a Hadoop cluster. Whereas on Hadoop you run “MapReduce jobs”, on Storm you run “topologies”. “Jobs” and “topologies” themselves are very different — one key difference is that a MapReduce job eventually finishes, whereas a topology processes messages forever (or until you kill it).

There are two kinds of nodes on a Storm cluster: the master node(called the “Nimbus“)  and the worker nodes(called the “Supervisor“).

 storm-cluster

All coordination between Nimbus and the Supervisors is done through a Zookeeper cluster. Additionally, the Nimbus daemon and Supervisor daemons are fail-fast and stateless; all state is kept in Zookeeper or on local disk. This means you can kill -9 Nimbus or the Supervisors and they’ll start back up like nothing happened. This design leads to Storm clusters being incredibly stable.

The basic primitives Storm provides for doing stream transformations are “spouts” and “bolts“. Spouts and bolts have interfaces that you implement to run your application-specific logic.

A spout is a source of streams. For example, a spout may read tuples off of a Kestrel queue and emit them as a stream. Or a spout may connect to the Twitter API and emit a stream of tweets.

A bolt consumes any number of input streams, does some processing, and possibly emits new streams. Complex stream transformations, like computing a stream of trending topics from a stream of tweets, require multiple steps and thus multiple bolts. Bolts can do anything from run functions, filter tuples, do streaming aggregations, do streaming joins, talk to databases, and more.

Comments

  1. nice article

Speak Your Mind

*